Blog : nutrition

Roasted Pear & Raspberry Coulis Chia Porridge

Roasted Pear & Raspberry Coulis Chia Porridge

Serves 2

Ingredients

Roasted Pear

  • 1 beurre bosc pear, peeled, halved
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • spray of coconut oil

Chia Porridge

  • ½ tsp vanilla bean paste
  • 1 ½ cup Luz Almond Milk
  • ¼ cup chia seeds

Raspberry Coulis

  • 1 cup frozen raspberries
  • ¼ cup water
  • ½ tsp vanilla
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup

 

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Method

  1. To prepare roasted pear – spray with coconut oil and sprinkle with cinnamon. Wrap in foil then bake in preheated moderate oven for 30 minutes or until tender.
  2. To prepare porridge – Place all ingredients in small saucepan over low-medium heat. Continue stirring until porridge thickens and becomes gelatinous.
  3. To prepare coulis – While porridge is cooking you can also prepare the coulis. Place all ingredients in small saucepan over medium heat, stirring occasionally and crushing raspberries. Allow it come to the boil then turn down to low and allow to simmer for a few minutes so it thickens.
  4. To serve – Divide porridge between two bowls. Slice pear halves into slices and arrange on top of porridge. Pour coulis around the edge. Serve immediately.

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5 Foods to Help You Avoid the Lurgy this Winter

5 Foods to Help You Avoid the Lurgy this Winter

While our friends in the Northern Hemisphere are revelling in the warmer weather, for us down under, the cooler months have begun to take their toll (unless we have been smart and decided to escape – Hello Europe) which has also meant an increase in colds and flus floating around! Our dietitian Olivia shares the 5 best foods for keeping your immune system in tip top shape:

  1. Fresh (or frozen) fruit and vegetables – you have heard the saying, “an apple a day keeps the doctor away” –  while it takes a bit more than an apple, the fundamental concept is there! Fruit and vegetables are rich sources of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and enzymes. Antioxidants in particular, boost the immune system by mopping up free radicals which attack cells. When people talk about antioxidants you will often hear them refer to the ORAC value – with higher values corresponding to higher antioxidant content. You will notice when you compare the ORAC values of F&V, a general rule of thumb is the darker the colour, the higher the antioxidant content. Blueberries and raspberries are particularly high in antioxidants so try adding them to your breakfast  or enjoying them as a snack through the day for a seriously delicious and low sugar boost to your immune system!IMG_6435
  2. Turmeric – This bright yellow coloured spice has been getting some serious airtime of late with turmeric being added to everything from your warming curry, the crumbing on your fish and increasingly as an alternative beverage to your morning coffee  (sans caffeine) with Turmeric Latte’s (AKA Golden Milk) popping up on menus everywhere. In an era of ‘superfoods’, Turmeric, a spice which has been around for centuries, has been escalated to stardom status. Curcumin, the active ingredient in Turmeric is responsible for it’s distinct yellow colour, as well as providing a list of health benefits, in particular reducing inflammation, with its benefits been comparable to that of anti-inflammatory drugs! It is also a powerful antioxidant and is a well tolerated treatment for irritable bowel syndrome. Try incorporating turmeric into your regime – we recommend a Golden Latte made on our Almond Milk for a delicious way to get the benefits!
  3. Ginger – A well known spice in Asian and Indian Cuisine, as well as being very popular in the western world, Ginger has long been heralded for its immune boosting properties. It is particularly effective for the relief of nausea and symptoms associated with colds and is best simply served as a ginger tea. Slice fresh ginger and place in mug topped with hot water. Add manuka honey and lemon for extra anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties!
  4. Yoghurt & Fermented foods – Probiotics found in yoghurts and other fermented foods play a major role in maintaining the balance of bacteria within our gut. Ensuring there is adequate good bacteria, is essential for keeping our digestive system functioning optimally as this represents the first line of defence against pathogens which ultimately make us sick. Incorporate yoghurt (try Luz Almond Milk Yoghurt) into your daily routine to give your gut a healthy boost!IMG_6469
  5. Matcha – Before there was turmeric, there was Matcha! A long standing tradition in Japanese culture, the Western world caught wind of this vibrant green powder a little while back and these days it is commonplace to see it in everything from lattes (Have you tried our Matcha Almond Milk?) to cakes, desserts and even pancakes! Matcha which literally meals ‘powdered tea’ is basically a super concentrated version of green tea, concentrated in everything from colour, to taste and health benefits. One of the main benefits associated with matcha is the buzz of energy similar to that of caffeine, but without the jittery and anxious side effects. It also rich in antioxidants (ORAC values 20 x that of blueberries) and is known to enhance mood and improve memory and concentration.Powderalmondsbottle
Chai Latte

Chai Latte

Ingredients

4 Black Tea Bags

2 cups Luz Almond Original or Date Almond Milk

2 tsp ground cinnamon

1 tsp ground cardamom

½ tsp ground ginger

¼ tsp ground cloves

Grind black pepper

Sweetener to taste

Method

  1. Place all ingredients except sweetener into a small saucepan over medium heat with the tea bags hanging out of the pot.
  2. Bring to the boil then reduce heat and allow to simmer for 10 minutes so flavour infuses.
  3. Squeeze tea bags to release flavour, mix and then taste.
  4. Add sweetener of your choice to taste (we recommend maple syrup or honey).
  5. Serve immediately.
Understanding the Difference Between Allergies & Intolerances

Understanding the Difference Between Allergies & Intolerances

Among the many reasons why people start drinking almond milk and other dairy alternatives is due to a food allergy or intolerance. This often means we are forced to limit our intake or rule out the offending substance, however the actual allergy or intolerance is often  due to a single compound within the food. The foods we eat are made up of various compounds including protein, fat, carbohydrates nutrients as well as natural chemicals, not to mention additives that can all single handedly cause adverse reactions.  In the case of cow’s milk, for example, some people (particularly children) will have an allergy to the protein in the milk, while others will have an intolerance to the sugar, lactose.

While the two are often grouped together, there are a few distinct differences. One of the primary differentiating factors is that an allergy illicits an immune response by producing specific antibodies against substances in the environment that are normally harmless. Contamination with an allergen usually results in swelling and inflammation which can occur all over the body. The severity can range from irritating to life threatening. In order to diagnose an allergy, most common methods include skin prick testing and blood testing for specific allergen born antibody. These tests are largely conclusive.
The most common food allergies are: peanuts, cow’s milk, soy, seafood and eggs.

An intolerance similarly causes an adverse reaction to food that can be mistaken for an allergy, as they share some symptoms, which can also be very severe. Yet unlike a true allergy, intolerances do NOT involve an immune response and does not show up on allergy testing mentioned above (blood test and skin prick testing).
The most common intolerances are: lactose, wheat sensitivity, salicytates, amines, glutamates, preservatives, artificial foods colours and food enhancers eg. MSG

Testing for intolerances is often far less conclusive and often exceptionally confusing. This is because not only are we always eating and drinking but people will also experience different reactions and to varying severities.  The best way to find foods responsible for food intolerances is to follow an elimination diet, followed by gradual reintroduction and challenges under the supervision of a professional. However due to the restrictiveness and time involved, many people will deal with undiagnosed intolerances, or worse self-diagnose.

Finally, you think you or someone you know is suffering from an intolerance or allergy, it is important to see your doctor to rule out anything life threatening.

Sweet & Spicy Almonds

Sweet & Spicy Almonds

The perfect solution to that mid afternoon snack attack!

Ingredients

  • 2 cups raw almonds
  • 20g butter
  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp cinnamon
  • 1-2 tbsp coconut sugar OR honey
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • Chilli flakes (optional)

Method

  1. Melt butter in large frypan over medium heat. Add olive oil then add almonds.
  2. Toss almonds to coat then add seasoning ingredients, stirring regularly to coat and allow to roast without burning.
  3. Once covered and lightly browned removed from heat and pour onto baking paper lined tray.
  4. Allow to cool.
  5. Enjoy by the handful!

 

Ambassador Profile: The FODMAP Friendly Vegan

Ambassador Profile: The FODMAP Friendly Vegan

The FODMAP Friendly Vegan was born following the experiences of Sharon, a vegan who found relief from uncomfortable digestive issues by following the rather restrictive, low – FODMAP diet. The Low-FODMAP diet was created in 1999 by a team of researchers at Monash University, led by Dr Sue Shepherd, who is credited with its inception. Today it has been published in international journals and is widely accepted as the most effective treatment for chronic gastrointestinal symptoms commonly associated with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Disease (IDS(D)). Through her website, The FODMAP Friendly Vegan, Sharon has decoded the science and wealth of information around low FODMAPs to create a user friendly hub for those suffering from similar symptoms.

She has also published an eBook by the same name. However you don’t have to have Irritable Bowel Syndrome or suffer from similar uncomfortable symptoms (or be a vegan for that matter) to enjoy the numerous delicious recipes Sharon shares through her eBook and blog. See just one example here for a yummy Roast Pumpkin Soup.

The FODMAP Friendly Vegan blog also has a wealth of resources covering topics such as the science behind the low – FODMAP diet, the diet itself, following a low-FODMAP diet in the real world as well as providing some healthy tips and even yoga poses for improving digestion.

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We encourage you to check out The FODMAP Friendly Vegan:

www.thefodmapfriendlyvegan.com

F: www.facebook.com/thefodmapfriendlyvegan

IG: www.instagram.com/thefodmapfriendlyvegan

Sweet Anti-inflammatory Roast Pumpkin Soup

Sweet Anti-inflammatory Roast Pumpkin Soup

Recipe courtesy of  The FODMAP Friendly Vegan

“Oregano is an amazing herb from a health perspective, and has been traditionally used to treat respiratory tract disorders, gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, menstrual cramps, and urinary tract disorders. It is often used in naturopathy to treat candida due to its potent antibacterial properties. It also contains vitamins A, C, E, and K, as well as fiber, folate, iron, magnesium, vitamin B6, calcium, and potassium. One active agent in oregano is rosmarinic acid, which is a strong antioxidant that may support immune system health. Fresh oregano has an intriguing, complex flavour, and the herb is among the few that dries incredibly well. In this recipe it draws out the sweetness of the caramalised pumpkin perfectly. This recipe will definitely become a family staple.”

Serves 4

Time taken: 50 mins

This is one of my favourite soups to prepare when my tum is playing up. Not only because it’s so easy to create, but also because it’s one of the tastiest. It is creamy (yet without cream), creates a cozy, warming feeling in your belly, is well-seasoned, and, to top it all off, is incredibly good for you! Oregano is an amazing herb from a health perspective, and has been traditionally used to treat respiratory tract disorders, gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, menstrual cramps, and urinary tract disorders. It is often used in naturopathy to treat candida due to its potent antibacterial properties. It also contains vitamins A, C, E, and K, as well as fiber, folate, iron, magnesium, vitamin B6, calcium, and potassium. One active agent in oregano is rosmarinic acid, which is a strong antioxidant that may support immune system health. Fresh oregano has an intriguing, complex flavour, and the herb is among the few that dries incredibly well. In this recipe it draws out the sweetness of the caramalised pumpkin perfectly. This recipe will definitely become a family staple.

Nourishing Ingredients:

  • 1 jap pumpkin (you could use butternut too – however note this is less FODMAP friendly due to its Oligos & Polyols content – so judge for yourself if this is safe)
  • 1 large carrot, cut into thick rounds
  • 1/2 cup roughly chopped spring onion tips
  • 1 tsp pure maple syrup
  • 3 cups vegetable stock (homemade is best to avoid added onion and/or garlic powders)
  • 1 cup Luz Almond original almond milk
  • 2.5 cm piece of fresh ginger, peeled and minced
  • 3 oregano sprigs (or 2 tsp dried oregano)
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric (you can use freshly grated or powdered)
  • A sprinkle of ground nutmeg
  • Coconut oil for frying
  • Extra virgin olive oil for coating
  • Himalayan salt & pepper to season
  • Optional: toasted pumpkin seeds & coconut cream to top

 

To Create: 

  1. Preheat an oven to 190ºC. Cut the pumpkin in half & scoop out the seeds.
  2. Place both halves on a baking sheet and fill each cavity with 1 sprig of oregano.  Drizzle the pumpkin with olive oil and sprinkle it with salt & pepper.
  3. Carefully turn the halves. Roast for about an hour, until soft and caramelised. Remove the pumpkin from the oven (turning off the oven) & allow to cool for 10 minutes.
  4. Place a heavy-bottomed pan on medium heat. Sauté the spring onion tips in some coconut oil. Add the ginger and chopped carrot and stir to combine. Scoop out the flesh of the cooled pumpkin and add it to the pot. Add the turmeric and maple syrup. Stir well. Allow the mixture to caramelise slightly but keep an eye on it.
  5. After a few minutes, add the vegetable stock to the pan and stir. Lower the heat and allow the mixture to simmer for 20 minutes.
  6. Using an immersion or high-speed blender, puree the soup until smooth. Add the nutmeg and stir. Taste and add salt & pepper as required.
  7. Pour the soup into bowls and top with some oregano leaves and a swirl of coconut cream if you’re feeling fancy. You could also add some toasted pumpkin seeds or activated buckwheat for added crunch.
Orange & Pomegranate Bircher Muesli

Orange & Pomegranate Bircher Muesli

Inspired by a recipe from Theresa Cutter, the Healthy Chef

Serves 2

Ingredients

  • 1 cup traditional rolled oats
  • 1 tbsp chia seeds
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • Juice from 1 orange
  • 200g Luz Almond Vanilla or Natural Yoghurt
  • Arils from 1 pomegranate
  • 2 oranges, chopped
  • 1 green apple, finely chopped
  • Honey / maple syrup

Method

  1. Combine oats, chia seeds, orange juice and yoghurt and mix to combine. Cover and allow to soak overnight.
  2. Fold through apple and divide between two bowls.
  3. Top with fresh orange, pomegranate arils and a light drizzle of honey.
  4. Enjoy immediately or take in a container or jar to work!

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Breakfast Trifle

Breakfast Trifle

Super easy and EXTRA delicious! Feel free to use different fruit, nuts, cereal as you wish!

Serves 1

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup fresh or frozen berries
  • 1 tub Luz Almond Yoghurt (we used mango)
  • ½ – ¾ cup your favour muesli or rolled oatsIMG_6439

Method

  1. Layer half the muesli on the bottom of a glass/clear bowl.
  2. Top with half the tub of Luz Almond Yoghurt, then top with half the berries.
  3. Repeat with remaining muesli, then Luz Almond yoghurt and finally finish off with berries.
  4. Enjoy immediately!

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